Category Archives: Conference Paper

CO2-Free NH3

Ken-ichi Aika
Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016

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RELATED NH3 FUEL CONFERENCE PAPERS

2013: Ammonia as an Energy Carrier for Renewable Energy

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Ken-ichi Aika, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Learn more about the 2016 NH3 Fuel Conference

The Benefits of Ammonia Fuel for Transport, Storage, and Safety

John Mott
Gordon Bros Limited / Ammonia Safety Training Institute (ASTI), Australia

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016 Continue reading

Japan – a future market for Australian solar ammonia

Keith Lovegrove
ITP Thermal Pty Ltd, Australia

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016

ABSTRACT

Japan and Australia are intimately linked in energy trade. Australia counts energy exports as a major source of foreign exchange income and Japan, which uses nearly 4 times the primary energy as Australia, imports nearly all of it. Approximately 40% of Australia’s coal exports are bought by Japan and were worth $AUD15.4 billion in 2012-13. Over 70% of Australia’s LNG exports went to Japan in the same period and earned over $AUD12billion. Future energy supply is high on the agenda for Japan. Currently 43% of its primary energy is in the form of imported oil mostly from the Middle East. The cost of this together with energy security concerns is a major driver for change. Post the Fukushima Nuclear disaster, the previous 8% contribution from Nuclear dropped to zero and there is much opposition to reinstating it. Japan still has a strong policy agenda to reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

One of the identified routes to a cleaner energy future is the wider use of hydrogen as a fuel in both the transport and power generation sectors. There are a range of technology approaches that allow solar technologies to produce transportable alternative fuels that could form the basis for a future clean energy trade with Japan. If energy is transported as an energy dense liquid in conventional tanker ships, then the effective efficiency of transport over distances of 6000km (Australia to Japan) is greater than 98%. Three options for importing hydrogen fuel into Japan are under serious consideration; cryogenic liquid hydrogen, reversible hydrogenation of toluene, and conversion of hydrogen to ammonia. Ammonia is increasingly considered as the favourable path. It offers higher energy density, leverages an existing global industry and has the potential for direct combustion in combined cycle power plants and heavy transport. Considering Australia’s vast untapped solar resource together with the existing energy trade history plus a history of upstream investments by Japanese companies in Australian Energy developments, suggests the two countries are ideal partners in a future solar fuels trade.

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Download this presentation here [PDF, 3.8MB]

RELATED NH3 FUEL CONFERENCE PAPERS

2008: Ammonia Production and Baseload Solar Power [PDF]

LINKS

Keith Lovegrove, ITP
Learn more about the 2016 NH3 Fuel Conference

Decentralised ammonia production in the Netherlands

Hans Vrijenhoef
Proton Ventures, The Netherlands

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016

ABSTRACT

Our presentation will summarize the results of two government funded research projects Proton carried out over the last year. Continue reading

The Investment Case for Sustainable Ammonia Synthesis Technologies

Trevor Brown
AmmoniaIndustry.com, USA

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016

ABSTRACT

For 100 years, we have made ammonia with the Haber-Bosch process, almost always using a fossil fuel feedstock. Recently, though, government policy, academic innovation, commercial opportunity, and human morality have combined to spur the development of new, “green” ammonia manufacturing processes: sustainable, low-carbon technologies.

These new synthesis methods augur a future in which, instead of the single, over-riding drive toward the economies of scale associated with Haber-Bosch, an array of different feedstocks, uses, and business models will support a multiplicity of competing technologies serving multiple markets. Continue reading

Key Life Cycle Assessment Numbers for NH3, Green and Brown Energy

Yusuf Bicer1, Ibrahim Dincer1, Calin Zamfirescu1, Greg Vezina2*, Frank Raso2
1 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, and 2 Hydrofuel Inc., Canada

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 20, 2016

ABSTRACT

This talk will present the results of two recent studies.

In the first study, four different ammonia production methods are comparatively evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). Continue reading

Carbon Free liquid fuel for tomorrow’s piston and turbine generators

Doug Barnett
Green Party of California, USA

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 19, 2016

ABSTRACT

In the 1960s the US Army and University of California modified and flew military helicopter and fixed-wing turbine aircraft by burning pure ammonia. The plan was to generate NH3 from local air & water in remote locations, sparing little expense by modifying only the engine’s firebox and air intake. Continue reading