University of Minnesota

Wind to Ammonia

The University of Minnesota – West Central Research and Outreach Center has configured a system to convert wind energy into ammonia. The pilot plant was formally dedicated on July 11th, 2013.

The approach uses wind power to drive a water electrolysis system to produce hydrogen, and an air separation unit to take nitrogen from air. The hydrogen and nitrogen are combined in an advanced catalytic reactor developed at the university. The goal of the project is to produce ammonia, either for fertilizer or fuel, which is cost competitive with fossil-fuel derived ammonia fertilizer or fuel.

NH3 Fuel Conference Papers

2014: Life-cycle greenhouse gas and energy balance of community-scale wind powered ammonia production [LINK]
2013: Ammonia Production Using Wind Energy [LINK]
2012: Lessons Learned in Developing a Wind-to-Ammonia Pilot Plant [PDF]
2011: Production of Anhydrous Ammonia from Wind Energy — Anatomy of a Pilot Plant, The Sequel [PDF]
2010: Production of Anhydrous Ammonia from Wind Energy — Anatomy of a Pilot Plant [PDF]
2009: Ammonia from Wind, Progress Update [PDF]
2008: Ammonia from Wind, an Update [PDF]
2007: Ammonia from Wind, an Update [PDF]
2006: Wind to Ammonia [PDF]

Further Information

University of Minnesota – Renewable Energy Initiatives, Ammonia
University of Minnesota, West Central Research and Outreach Center, 46352 State Hwy 329, Morris, MN 56267, US
Contact: Mike Reese, Renewable Energy Director, 320-589-1711.

3 responses to “University of Minnesota

  1. Pingback: Ammonia Production Using Wind Energy | NH3 Fuel Association

  2. Pingback: Morris, MN — University of Minnesota | Ammonia Industry

  3. Pingback: Wind to Ammonia ? | The Ammonia Technicians Association of New Zealand Incorporated

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