Development of ammonia / natural gas dual fuel gas turbine combustor

Shintaro Ito*1, Soichiro Kato1, Tsukasa Saito1, Toshiro Fujimori1, Hideaki Kobayashi2
1IHI Corporation, Japan
2Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Japan

NH3 Fuel Conference, Los Angeles, September 19, 2016

ABSTRACT

NH3 is a carbon-free fuel, so it has the potential to reduce CO2 emission from the power plant when used as a fuel. However, NH3 has combustion characteristics different from conventional hydrocarbon fuels. The N atom in the ammonia molecule causes high NOx emission through combustion reactions. To develop a gas-turbine combustor, which burns a combination of NH3 and natural gas with controlled emissions, combustion characteristics have been studied experimentally and numerically by using a swirl-burner, which is typically used in gas-turbines. Detailed exhaust gas compositions of the burner have been measured under atmospheric pressure and fuel lean conditions. As equivalence ratio increases, amounts of unburnt species (NH3, CO and THC (Total Hydro Carbon)) decrease in contrast to NO and N2O emissions. The burner achieves combustion efficiencies above 97% for ammonia-mixing-ratios below 50%. It has been found that it is difficult to achieve both, low emissions and high combustion efficiency, in single-stage combustor. Therefore, a low-emission combustion concept using two-stage combustion was devised. Calculations revealed that this concept offers controllability of NOx and unburnt gas species emissions.

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OTHER NH3 FUEL CONFERENCE PAPERS

2015: Combustion characteristics of ammonia/natural gas dual fuel burner for gas turbine combustor

LINKS

IHI Corporation
Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University
Learn more about the 2016 NH3 Fuel Conference

2 responses to “Development of ammonia / natural gas dual fuel gas turbine combustor

  1. Pingback: Ammonia Turbine Power Generation with Reduced NOx – Ammonia Energy

  2. How difficult/costly would it be to adapt a turboprop engine to run on ammonia?

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